Parenteral antibiotic therapy for young infants (aged 0–59 days) with suspected sepsis is sometimes not available or feasible in countries with high neonatal mortality. Outpatient treatment could save lives in such settings. The authors in this study aimed to assess the equivalence of two simplifi ed antibiotic regimens, comprising fewer injections and oral rather than parenteral administration, compared with a reference treatment for young infants with clinical severe infection. Two simplifi ed antibiotic regimens requiring fewer injections are equivalent to a reference treatment for young infants with signs of clinical severe infection but without signs of critical illness. The use of these simplifi ed regimens has the potential to increase access to treatment for sick young infants who cannot be referred to hospital.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(16)30335-7/fulltext

References

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  2. WHO. Pocket book of hospital care for children: second edition— guidelines for the management of common childhood illnesses. 2013. http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/ child_hospital_care/en/

  3. Zaidi AK, Tikmani SS, Warraich HJ, et al. Community-based treatment of serious bacterial infections in newborns and young infants: a randomized controlled trial assessing three antibiotic regimens. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2012; 31: 667–72.

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Neonatal Health  Child Health  

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