The authors aimed to describe the incidence, characteristics, transmission, and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in neonates who received inpatient hospital care in the UK. The findings suggest that neonatal SARS-CoV-2 infection is uncommon in babies admitted to hospital. Infection with neonatal admission following birth to a mother with perinatal SARS-CoV-2 infection was unlikely, and possible vertical transmission rare, supporting international guidance to avoid separation of mother and baby. The high proportion of babies from Black, Asian, or minority ethnic groups requires investigation.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanchi/article/PIIS2352-4642(20)30342-4/fulltext?utm_source=MHTF+Subscribers&utm_campaign=6ce94fe03e-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_27_03_30_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8ac9c53ad4-6ce94fe03e-183804741#%20

References

  1. Docherty AB Harrison EM Green CA et al. Features of 20 133 UK patients in hospital with COVID-19 using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol: prospective observational cohort study. BMJ. 2020; 369m1985

  2. Kirtsman M Diambomba Y Poutanen SM et al. Probable congenital SARS-CoV-2 infection in a neonate born to a woman with active SARS-CoV-2 infection. CMAJ. 2020; 192: e647-e650

  3. Kamdar S Hutchinson R Laing A et al.
    Perinatal inflammation influences but does not arrest rapid immune development in preterm babies.
    Nat Commun. 2020; 111284

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COVID-19  Coronavirus  Pneumonia  Neonatal Health  

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